Vanishing Into the Mist

The last thing we saw before Moshe ascended to Sinai, was a person being shrouded in mist, into the unknown, and the scary fiery mountain. Since this is my Bar Mitzvah parasha, this subject is close to hear, and I was playing with this idea in my 2014 Barkai Parasha Drawing series.

Shuli Rand’s song ערפל – mist – comes to mind. Moshe went into the mist, for there was the Lord.

וַיַּעֲמֹד הָעָם מֵרָחֹק וּמֹשֶׁה נִגַּשׁ אֶל־הָעֲרָפֶל אֲשֶׁר־שָׁם הָאֱלקים שמות כ, יח

So the people remained at a distance, while Moses approached the thick cloud where God was. (Shemot 20:28)

Moshe going vanishing into the mist, ascending Sinai

And then I wanted to see what it would look like in a smoky, gray scale palette.

וַיַּעַל מֹשֶׁה אֶל־הָהָר וַיְכַס הֶעָנָן אֶת־הָהָר׃ וַיִּשְׁכֹּן כְּבוֹד־ה׳ עַל־הַר סִינַי וַיְכַסֵּהוּ הֶעָנָן שֵׁשֶׁת יָמִים וַיִּקְרָא אֶל־מֹשֶׁה בַּיּוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִתּוֹךְ הֶעָנָן׃ וּמַרְאֵה כְּבוֹד ה׳ כְּאֵשׁ אֹכֶלֶת בְּרֹאשׁ הָהָר לְעֵינֵי בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ וַיָּבֹא מֹשֶׁה בְּתוֹךְ הֶעָנָן וַיַּעַל אֶל־הָהָר וַיְהִי מֹשֶׁה בָּהָר אַרְבָּעִים יוֹם וְאַרְבָּעִים לָיְלָה׃

שמות כב:טו-יח

When Moses had ascended the mountain, the cloud covered the mountain. The Presence of the LORD abode on Mount Sinai, and the cloud hid it for six days. On the seventh day He called to Moses from the midst of the cloud. Now the Presence of the LORD appeared in the sight of the Israelites as a consuming fire on the top of the mountain. Moses went inside the cloud and ascended the mountain; and Moses remained on the mountain forty days and forty nights.

Shemot 24:15-18

Moshe vanishing – in gray

The Burning Bush

Another two of my parasha pastel drawings for Parashat Shemot, during my 2013-14 year teaching at Barkai Yeshivah.

  1. Pharaoh’s Daughter finds Moshe (my grandfather OBM said that the basket looks like a crockpot)!
  2. The Burning Bush

 

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Pharaoh’s daughter finds the basket with the Hebrew Baby. Pastel on paper, 2014.

 

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The Burning Bush, with the verse. Pastel on paper. 2014.

Drawings for Parashat Vayeshev

Last year I posted these pictures in the context of “Dreams“, but here I would like to focus specifically on this parasha. I posted Yosef in the pit first, and not his dreams which got him there, because it is more in line with the goal of this series.

In 2013-14, while teaching at Barkai Yeshivah in Flatbush, I would regularly draw a pastel drawing as students were preparing their parasha study sheets. My guiding principal was to find something not stereotypical, if possible. Below this picture is Yosef’s dreams – quite a stereotypical motif – which I must pay homage to. However, this is a unique picture, because it is intended to express despair, being alone and abandoned.

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Wedding Picture

Back in 2009, I was working with a person who owned a jewelry store in Meah She’arim. At the time, we were working on some ideas of reproducing my art in giclee –  printing pastel painting scans onto canvas, and adding paint into them for a higher value.

Well, I’ll say I’ve experimented with different ways of selling my art, but I am happy that this venue didn’t work out. It didn’t feel authentic and I did not want to market myself in such a way.

Anyway, he asked if I would make a pastel painting of his wedding. First of all, I don’t really like working from photographs, and second – there are so many people in the background – overload!

Long story short, I ended up doing it anyway, and here is the result:

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Dreams

This post is in honor of the current weekly Torah portions, and my favorite Biblical character – Yosef!

(For the general public, I will call him Joseph, henceforth).

My hero, Joseph the Dreamer. Beloved of his father, hated by his brothers, and oh, so romantic. Sold by his brothers – only to rise to the top of Egypt and meet his brothers again – and try to bond with them, once again. Yet this post is not about Joseph the Dreamer, nor the Seeker of Brotherhood, but about dreams per se. Joseph is part of a new saga in the development of the Genesis narrative: The Saga of Dreams.

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Jacob’s Ladder. Pastel on paper. 2014

Up to this point in the narrative, Biblical characters are driven by conviction and purpose, perhaps even vision or revelation (which could have occurred in a dream). Seekers and fighters, yes, but not dreamers.

From here on, we hear about several dreams: Jacob’s Ladder, and later a bizarre dream relating to the strange goat-sheet breeding episode. Joseph dreams time and again, and then becomes an interpreter of several critical dreams.

On his way northeast, Jacob makes a rest stop in Beit-El (Bethel), and in his slumber he has a defining dream – one which speaks of history (taking for granted Midrashic and Kabbalistic interpretations), the rise and fall of the Great Empires of the world, and his place in the scheme of things. But it is also a dream in which he sees himself from the outside.

He had a dream; a stairway was set on the ground and its top reached to the sky, and angels of God were going up and down on it. 

And G-d was standing beside him and He said, “I am G-d, the Lord of your father Abraham and the Lord of Isaac: the ground on which you are lying I will assign to you and to your offspring. (Gen 28:12-13)

Jacob – dreaming – seeing himself from the outside. Out of body experience?  Freudian analyses, anyone?

This images speak strongly to me of a delving into the experience of consciousness itself, and the matter of the subconscious. Several contemporary ideas come to my mind. One of them is the 1990 film Jacob’s Ladder. Not an easy movie to watch, but it has a poignant interpretation of a ladder: Constant, repetitive awakening from a nightmare. Once awake, it was clear that the previous experience was, indeed, a dream. But then he wakes up again, and again, and again.

The main source of inspiration for my drawing (though poorly represented) is Kurt Gödel‘s incompleteness theorems. The ladder could thus represent an infinite climb to higher orders of truth, or reality, from which the lower levels can be better understood. Kabalistically, this would work well with various interpretations of Jacob’s attributes, as well as his connection to Truth and Beauty.

I tried to express, in the least, the idea of a ladder which takes us outside of the confinements of the parochial. A vision which takes us outside of the planet and into the stars.

 

The next drawing is about starts. And the sun, and the moon. And sheathes. Josephs’ two defining dreams, both a premonition of his greatness, and the cause of his alienation from his brothers:

His brothers answered, “Do you mean to reign over us? Do you mean to rule over us?” And they hated him even more for his talk about his dreams. (Gen. 37:8)

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All that didn’t end well for Joseph.

Joseph was driven by his dreams. And dreams indeed helped him rise from the depths of despair to the top of the world.

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Joseph in the pit. Pastel on paper. 2014

 

Emor: the blasphemer – ציור לפרשת אמור: המקלל

This is a dark drawing. Solemn.

Those who heard the blasphemer, must put their hands on his head, and then stone him to death.

ציור קודר. אפל.

השומעים את המקלל, סומכים את ידיהם על ראשו. ואחר כך יסקלוהו

הוֹצֵא אֶת הַמְקַלֵּל אֶל מִחוּץ לַמַּחֲנֶה וְסָמְכוּ כָל הַשֹּׁמְעִים אֶת יְדֵיהֶם עַל רֹאשׁוֹ וְרָגְמוּ אֹתוֹ כָּל הָעֵדָה

ויקרא כד, יד

© Nachliel Selavan 2014
המקלל: גזר הדין
פסטל על נייר
The blasphemer: the verdict
pastel on paper.