The Burning Bush

Another two of my parasha pastel drawings for Parashat Shemot, during my 2013-14 year teaching at Barkai Yeshivah.

  1. Pharaoh’s Daughter finds Moshe (my grandfather OBM said that the basket looks like a crockpot)!
  2. The Burning Bush

 

11 בת פרעה ותיבת משה
Pharaoh’s daughter finds the basket with the Hebrew Baby. Pastel on paper, 2014.

 

12 הסנה איננו אוכל
The Burning Bush, with the verse. Pastel on paper. 2014.

Drawings for Parashat Vayeshev

Last year I posted these pictures in the context of “Dreams“, but here I would like to focus specifically on this parasha. I posted Yosef in the pit first, and not his dreams which got him there, because it is more in line with the goal of this series.

In 2013-14, while teaching at Barkai Yeshivah in Flatbush, I would regularly draw a pastel drawing as students were preparing their parasha study sheets. My guiding principal was to find something not stereotypical, if possible. Below this picture is Yosef’s dreams – quite a stereotypical motif – which I must pay homage to. However, this is a unique picture, because it is intended to express despair, being alone and abandoned.

07-%d7%99%d7%95%d7%a1%d7%a3-%d7%91%d7%91%d7%95%d7%a806-%d7%97%d7%9c%d7%95%d7%9e%d7%95%d7%aa-%d7%99%d7%95%d7%a1%d7%a3

Thunder and Lightening ברקים ורעמים

Just in time for winter…

These illustrations are part of a series of kids’ books illustrations I was working on with musician and author Yerucham Levi. Sadly, it never took off. They are illustrations for a Hebrew poem called “Thunder and Lightening“. Since I made these, over a decade ago, I lost the original poem. I do hope to retrieve them upon my next visit to Jerusalem.

The basic idea of the poem is that the thunder and lightening are roaring, scaring away everyone. Weeping clouds, angry clouds, roaring clouds (thus I anthropomorphized them). But then the child, who is watching this, reproofs the clouds, the thunder and the lightening, for they are scaring away everyone – even the stars!

 

Illustration with mixed media: Indian ink, gauche and aquarelle. Some of them were inspired by Where the Wild Things Are, a wonderful children’s book by Maurice Sendak. See if you can guess which?

All off these images are copyright to Nachliel Selavan. The concept for the poem is copyright to Yerucham Levi.

בדיוק בזמן לקראת החורף

האיורים הללו הם חלק מסדרה של איורים לספרי ילדים שהכנתי בשיתוף עם המוזיקאי והסופר ירוחם לוי. לצערי, הסידרה לא יצאה לאור. לחיבור קוראים ״ברקים ורעמים״ (כל הזכויות שמורות לירוחם לוי). מאז שאיירתי אותם לפני למעלה מעשור, איבדתי את הטקסט המקורי. אני מקווה למצוא אותו בביקורי הבא בירושלים

הרעיון הכללי של החיבור הוא שהברקים והרעמים בוכים, מיללים, זועפים ושואגים (הלכך האנשתי אותם), ומפחידים את כולם. הילד, שמבונן בכל זה, יוצא וצועק על העננים, כי הם מפחידים את כולם – אפילו את הכוכבים

צוייר בעזרת דיו, אקוורל וגואש. חלק מהאיורים בהשראת ״ארץ יצורי הפרא״, ספר ילדים נפלא מאת מוריס סנדק. התוכלו לזהות אילו מתוכם?ח

על הזכויות על האיורים שמורות לנחליאל שה-לבן, וכל הזכויות על הרעיון של החיבור, שמורות לירוחם לוי

thunder01small
Two pictures intended to be side-by-side: Weeping clouds
thunder02small
and Angry clouds
thunder03small
Next: roaring clouds, scaring everyone away
thunder04small
Image for two pages, across: Child in bed, with a warm cup of hot cocoa, observing the storm outside. I decided against adding lightening to the image (though it should be there), because the window is where the text would go. The lightening was a photoshop job, which didn’t happen yet
thunder05small
Child goes outside and shouts at the clouds
thunder06small
The clouds suddenly get a grip. They see that the stars are running away!